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Adithya Biloor
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Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:24 pm
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Regards,
Adithya Biloor
www.lensandtales.com


Adithya Biloor  Joined CNP On 29 May 2008    Total Image posts 252    -   Total Image Comments 791    -   Image Post to Comment Ratio 1:3    -   Image Comment Density 42     -     Total Forum Posts 151

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Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Thu Aug 04, 2016 8:12 am

Well caught! :)

On a serious note, 'life' amazes me these days which I have taken for granted all these years, be it an ant or a plant.

ಏನರ್ಥವಿದಕೆಲ್ಲ ಮಂಕುತಿಮ್ಮ...

What does it all mean? Does it care? Should we? a long puzzle...

Welcome back , thanks for sharing, Adithya. Hope to see you in couple of weeks if everything goes well as planned...

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Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life



» Last edited by Ganesh H Shankar on Fri Aug 05, 2016 6:43 am; edited 1 time in total

Commentby Adithya Biloor on Thu Aug 04, 2016 12:03 pm

Jerry Grotowski , a famous theatre personality in his later stages of career moved way from the public performances. He thought and used it as a mean of spiritual journey.

Mayaloka, last novel by prominent Kannada writer PoorNachandra Tejaswi, as the title suggests tries to look the day to day business of this world as 'maya'.

It amazes me, how after all the rigorous efforts to understand the world those personalities turn inside to understand the world.

How to look this world as neither dark, nor dark...?

I hope the journey continues through the 'maya' called 'art'...

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Regards,
Adithya Biloor
www.lensandtales.com

Commentby Rajkumar on Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:52 pm

Sir Maya, Chaya, Geetha could not help hoping Art and nature will hold a mirror :) ( in lighter vien )

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Art is about what is inside rather than what is outside

Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:12 am

Adithya, I did some search on youtube to see some work by Jerry Grotowski, most of the uploaded work appears to be in non-english..

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Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life

Commentby Adithya Biloor on Sat Aug 06, 2016 12:36 pm

I have one of his book (Kannada translation ), will share it with you.

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Regards,
Adithya Biloor
www.lensandtales.com

Commentby Raviprakash S S on Tue Aug 09, 2016 9:05 am

Wonderful picture Adithya. As Raj mentioned, i too am not bothered about Maya, Chaya ;)

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Cheers,
Raviprakash.S.S
http://www.allEYES.in

Commentby dinesh.ramarao on Wed Aug 10, 2016 10:25 am

"ನಾವೇಕೆ ಎಲ್ಲದಕ್ಕೂ ಅರ್ಥ ಹುಡುಕುತ್ತಾ ಇರಬೇಕು ? "
-RD

Commentby Ghanshyam Savani on Wed Aug 10, 2016 10:31 am

Gurdjieff used to say that there are two kinds of art. One he used to call objective art, and the other he used to call subjective art. Subjective art is absolutely private, personal. Picasso’s art is subjective art; he is simply painting something without any vision for the person who will see it, without any idea of the person who will look at it. He is simply pouring out his own inner illness; it is helpful for himself, it is therapeutic.

The ancient art was not only art; it was, deep down, mysticism. Deep down, it was out of meditation. It was objective, in Gurdjieff’s terminology. It was made so that if somebody meditates over it, he starts falling into those depths where God lives.

Khajuraho or Konarak — if you meditate there, you will know what the Tantra masters were doing. They were creating in stone something that is felt in the ultimate orgasmic joy. It was the most difficult thing to do, to bring ecstasy into the stone. And if the stone can show the ecstasy, then everybody can move into that ecstasy easily.

But people who go to Khajuraho are foolish people. They look either, at Khajuraho sculpture as obscene — then they miss the whole point, then they are seeing something which is within their own unconscious; or they are too moralistic — then they don’t meditate on any statues, they are in a hurry to get out of the temple somehow, they just throw glances.

Khajuraho sculpture is not just to see, it is for meditation. Sit silently and meditate for hours. If one goes to Khajuraho, one should live at least for three months there, so he can meditate on each possible inner posture of orgasmic joy. And then, slowly slowly, the at-onement, slowly slowly, the harmony; then suddenly you are transported into another world — the world of those mystics who created this temple. This is objective art.

Osho, The Book of Wisdom, Ch 24

--
Ghanshyam Savani
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ghanshyam ... ?details=1

Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Thu Aug 11, 2016 8:39 am

He is simply pouring out his own inner illness; it is helpful for himself, it is therapeutic.


Hmm, interesting!

--
Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life

Commentby Ghanshyam Savani on Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:15 am

Picasso’s pictures are subjective art. Seeing a painting by Picasso … he has not considered you, who are going to see the painting. You are not taken into account at all. He has simply vomited his own madness on the canvas. It is simply vomit; hence you cannot go on looking at a Picasso painting for a long time. You will start feeling tense, your stomach will start feeling weird — because Picasso is not concerned with you, what happens to you, he is simply subjective. He is pouring out his own mind, what is happening to him; unconcerned about humanity or anybody. He is going crazy, that’s why his painting is crazy.

Almost all the painters in the West have gone mad once or twice in their life, and have been put into mad asylums. Many of the Western painters have committed suicide. This has never happened in the East. There is not a single instance in ten thousand years that a painter, a musician, a poet, has been mad, or has committed suicide. The reason is, it was art on the surface, but meditation in depth. In the West it is just surface, there is no depth in it. And the surface is without any compassion, without any consideration, without any responsibility, When you compose music or poetry you are to understand that somebody will be reading it — what effect it is going to have on the person? Will it drive him sane or insane?

Osho, From Darkness to Light, Ch 7

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Ghanshyam Savani
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ghanshyam ... ?details=1

Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Fri Aug 12, 2016 9:31 am

Interesting thoughts, thanks for sharing. Actually it gets more complex, I guess, if we think about the purpose of life, which probably is subjective again.

Picasso believed that an art is a point of view contrasting that with Tolstoy's view which was art conveys feeling and emotions. To me the latter is more meaningful. However, I think, what is right or what is wrong is very subjective. That said, I think the most important environment for the art to develop is freedom of expression. Forcing an artist to paint what others like or benefit from, be it divine or useful to others is *not* good for art. So, I don't fully agree with Osho's views here. As an artist I may love to do that at times but at some other time not really - I may be expressing my basic needs (like breathing) as images, for myself. They are not made for others. An interesting thing about art is the moment we try to characterise or define it the very moment it slips, does not conform to the very boundary that we try to restrict it to.

In all humbleness I think cubism was a creative new technique at that time, probably a craft. I am yet to figure out the point of painting everything as cubes - chair, violin, lady, building,... as cubes (so what?). All my internet search to decipher the intent, meaning apart from being a 'new technique' for that time did not go anywhere. Probably Picasso did not care what others thought, neither we need to care what those cubes mean. On a lighter note, I not sure whether Picasso himself did :)

--
Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life



» Last edited by Ganesh H Shankar on Sat Aug 13, 2016 9:31 am; edited 1 time in total

Commentby Ghanshyam Savani on Fri Aug 12, 2016 3:50 pm

Yes, Sir......very interesting.......

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Ghanshyam Savani
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ghanshyam ... ?details=1

Commentby Ghanshyam Savani on Fri Aug 12, 2016 3:56 pm

My definition of sane art is that listening to it, looking at it, it gives you health, wholeness, silence, peace. […]

Classical music has tremendous sanity. It can make even an insane person sane. Just listening to classical music, he may calm down. But jazz — even a sane person may start feeling a jerk.

All that has happened in the modern art, whether it is painting or music or poetry, it is great but yet it is not sane.

Osho, The Last Testament, Vol 3, Ch 30



Modern man is suffering, is in immense misery and hell and that shows in modern art. Modern art is a reflection. Art is always a reflection, it is a mirror, because the artist is the most sensitive person in the society, hence he is first to become aware of what is happening; others take a longer time to become aware.

The poet is the most prophetic because he becomes aware of things which are going to happen, he becomes aware a little ahead of time, hence he is never understood.

Modern art is psychotic — it reflects humanity. It shows that something has gone wrong, very wrong: man is falling apart.

Osho, Zen: Zest. Zip, Zap and Zing, Ch 14



"Every art can be described either as objective art, or as subjective art. Subjective art you will find everywhere. It comes from your feelings, from your heart, from your mind: in paintings, in poetry, in music.

But objective art comes from the emptiness of your heart; you just become a flute, a hollow bamboo and the universe sings through you. Your only credit is that you don’t create any hindrances, you simply allow the universe to flow through you. With you being in a let-go and allowing the universe to flow through you, objective art is created.

There is not much objective art in the world, because before objective art can be created you have to become a hollow bamboo; and you are so solid, your ego is so stubborn. Before creating objective art, you have to be so humble, almost nobody. In your absence there comes a great universal flood. That flood can become poetry, a painting, music, a dance, a sculpture. Thousands of dimensions are available, you just allow it. "

OSHO
Nansen: The Point of Departure, Chapter 9

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Ghanshyam Savani
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ghanshyam ... ?details=1



» Last edited by Ghanshyam Savani on Fri Aug 12, 2016 4:01 pm; edited 2 times in total

Commentby Vikas T R on Fri Aug 12, 2016 4:57 pm

enjoying the image and the conversation too.

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"The art of simplicity is a puzzle of complexity."
-Vikas
PhotoGallery of Vikas