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dinesh.ramarao
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I will leave it to you for your interpretation. Any word on this image on my intentions, technique, may bias your viewing.
thanks for viewing, c & c
best regards,
-RD
Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:46 am
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dinesh.ramarao  Joined CNP On 10 Sep 2008    Total Image posts 232    -   Total Image Comments 705    -   Image Post to Comment Ratio 1:3    -   Image Comment Density 38     -     Total Forum Posts 64

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Commentby Nilanjan Das on Fri Sep 23, 2011 10:24 am

I like this image , but it's a visual response, what is so different here is that in most of the images we see, the different shades are mostly in horizontal layers, like the top 1/3rd or the bottom 1/3rd being light or dark, but here the darker region in the right 1/3rd of the frame is really working for me. There are some patterned lines and a lot of blotches in patterns which all together are looking quite artistic, but visually only. This word Abstract is actually a subject taught in art colleges, various expressions of abstractions. So I guess there can be various forms of abstractions. Visual abstractions and then imaginative abstracts. This image is appearing to be more like a visual abstract for me, leading my mind to ask the question what are these and what is the image trying to convey but then it ends there not allowing me to imagine something. ( something am ready to own up as a shortcoming of my imaginations as well ). Following a technique to create a visual and then leaving it for interpretations is one way of working but I myself like the other approach RD :-). I still feel its like hanging a blank canvas in front of you and then fill up balloons with color and throw on the canvas to see how does it look ? Though it is a very popular art form but it never attracted me. This would look great as a print RD. I can completely understand your thoughts, if lines and geometric patterns of reeds work, then why not these ? It would be a very pertinent question. Probably you would be right even telling me not every abstract or work of art needs to be understood as a theme or a story as well. It is so interesting how a human mind responds to definitive and indefinite complex stimuli of visual and mental responses. :-).

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Nilanjan Das Photography

Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Fri Sep 23, 2011 1:18 pm

RD, for now, I say I like it and wait for your description of what this actually is ? Some aerial view of a field ?
Will add more views later. Please do give a title, when we "like" it it goes as "Untitled" on to facebook :)

PS : I have been hard pressed for time since I have been working on some enhancements to this platform. Sorry for being cryptic. This state will last for another week I guess.

--
Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life



» Last edited by Ganesh H Shankar on Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:33 pm; edited 3 times in total

Commentby dinesh.ramarao on Mon Sep 26, 2011 11:58 am

Leaf of a palm tree, high iso, heavy crop. Offlate i'm trying to get the 'grains' that i loved when i was in early 20s that were with b/w images. These set of images are a series of experiments that i have been doing to get my grains in. The closest i could come to my liking as of now is with heavy crop. I'm sure, next week this would be executed as so called 'complete frame' image. However, i do think, cropping is not a crime :)

Well, did i imagine this image to be this 'abstract' with lines? To a large extent yes, i wanted the grains to be prominent and lines would give a bit of definition. I didnot imagine this be looking like and arial view as Ganesh thought. Some 1/3 rules that exist in this are purely accidental - may be habitual Nilanjan. With Ganesh's interpretation, to some extent i'm satisfied this as an abstract (according to my own definition :) ), which allowed the viewer to imagine.

thanks for your words friends.
-RD

Commentby Ganesh H Shankar on Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:07 am

It definitely become an abstract RD ! Actually I am happy that it lost its trace back to the palm leaf. Those bright regions sprinkled with black dots made me think it is an aerial view of the ground. More than that I think it has a subtle artistic quality which I am unable to articulate clearly. While noise is predominant part of that feel I tend to think just a bit less of it would have added. Thanks for sharing & good luck for your next "full frame" experiment. Come back and share the full frame variation too :)

--
Ganesh H. Shankar
Wishing you best light,

Image
Personal Websites Fine Art Nature Photography
Facebook Pages Ganesh H. Shankar | Fine Art Nature Photography | Art Of Life



» Last edited by Ganesh H Shankar on Tue Sep 27, 2011 9:34 pm; edited 2 times in total

Commentby Nilanjan Das on Tue Sep 27, 2011 9:14 am

RD, here are some interesting stuff I was reading about abstraction in art, thought of sharing with you....

Abstract art uses a visual language of form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world. Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways of describing visual experience to the artist. By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a new kind of art which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual preoccupations in all areas of Western culture at that time.

Abstract art, nonfigurative art, nonobjective art, and nonrepresentational art are loosely related terms. They are similar, although perhaps not of identical meaning.

Abstraction indicates a departure from reality in depiction of imagery in art. This departure from accurate representation can be only slight, or it can be partial, or it can be complete. Abstraction exists along a continuum. Even art that aims for verisimilitude of the highest degree can be said to be abstract, at least theoretically, since perfect representation is likely to be exceedingly elusive. Artwork which takes liberties, altering for instance color and form in ways that are conspicuous, can be said to be partially abstract. Total abstraction bears no trace of any reference to anything recognizable. In geometric abstraction, for instance, one is unlikely to find references to naturalistic entities. Figurative art and total abstraction are almost mutually exclusive. But figurative and representational (or realistic) art often contains partial abstraction.

Both geometric abstraction and lyrical abstraction are often totally abstract. Among the very numerous art movements that embody partial abstraction would be for instance fauvism in which color is conspicuously and deliberately altered vis-a-vis reality, and cubism, which blatantly alters the forms of the real life entities depicted.

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Nilanjan Das Photography